Basin effects and limitations of 1D site response analysis from 2D numerical models of the Thorndon basin

  • Christopher R McGann University of Canterbury, New Zealand
  • Brendon Bradley University of Canterbury, New Zealand
  • Liam Wotherspoon University of Auckland, NZ
  • Robin Lee University of Canterbury, New Zealand

Abstract

Plane strain (2D) finite element models are used to examine factors contributing to basin effects observed for multiple seismic events at sites in the Thorndon basin of Wellington, New Zealand. The models consider linear elastic soil and rock response when subjected to vertically-propagating shear waves. Depth-dependent shear wave velocities are considered in the soil layers, and the effects of random variations of soil velocity within layers are modelled. Various rock shear wave velocity configurations are considered to evaluate their effect on the modelled surficial response. It is shown that these simple 2D models are able to capture basin reverberations and compare more favourably to observations from strong motion recordings than conventional 1D site response models. It is also shown that consideration of a horizontal impedance contrast across the Wellington Fault affects spectral response and amplification at longer periods, suggesting the importance of this feature in future ground motion modelling studies in the Wellington region.

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Published
2021-03-01
How to Cite
McGann, C. R., Bradley, B., Wotherspoon, L., & Lee, R. (2021). Basin effects and limitations of 1D site response analysis from 2D numerical models of the Thorndon basin. Bulletin of the New Zealand Society for Earthquake Engineering, 54(1), 21-30. https://doi.org/10.5459/bnzsee.54.1.21-30
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Articles