Seismic hazard estimates for the Auckland area, and their design and construction implications

  • David J. Dowrick DSIR Physical Sciences, Lower Hutt, New Zealand

Abstract

Revised estimates of the return periods of Modified Mercalli (MM) intensity for Auckland and Northland, arising from a revision of the attenuation of intensity in New Zealand, and latest data and views on the local seismicity and geology, represent considerable reductions in the hazard given in Smith and Berryman's seismic hazard model of New Zealand. The revised levels are MM6 and MM7 for 150 and 1200 year return periods. This implies that most structures and plant in Auckland and Northland could have much simpler and less onerous earthquake resistant design and construction than required by current codes. This simpler approach would be significantly cheaper for older so-called "earthquake risk buildings" as well as new construction.

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Published
1992-09-30
How to Cite
Dowrick, D. J. (1992). Seismic hazard estimates for the Auckland area, and their design and construction implications. Bulletin of the New Zealand Society for Earthquake Engineering, 25(3), 211-221. https://doi.org/10.5459/bnzsee.25.3.211-221
Section
Articles